Best Postcard Apps For Smartphones

February 28, 2015 in Journal

Though the Month of Letters is over I know for a fact that many of you taking this challenge will continue to send out letters and cards and postcards throughout the year. Maybe not so many as this month, but more now that you have the letter writing bug. For those of you who particularly enjoyed sending out postcards, I have one final post for you.

Last year I talked about how much I love being able to send custom postcards right from my smartphone. I still do, and I still use Touchnote to do so most of the time. When this year’s challenge rolled around I decided to try and determine if Touchnote is really the best app for this purpose. The cards cost $1.99 and come from Europe, so they take some time to arrive. Were there any worthy services doing it faster or cheaper?

Throughout this month I tested postcard apps to find the answer to that question. The answer? Not really.

mypostcard app

Touchnote is still one of the best smartphone postcard apps out there. The only one I like better is MyPostcard, which is not cheaper or faster.

How did I go about making this determination? I started with some basic culling. There are a little over a dozen apps and services that offer the ability to create and send a postcard from your phone using your own image. Before I started testing, I whittled the list down by eliminating apps that are iOS only (no app can be the best if it ignores Android) and those that have really low ratings and terrible reviews.

That left me with four contenders: MyPostcard, Popcarte, Postino, and Touchnote.

Next, I used the apps to create a postcard to see how easy or difficult the process was.

Postino had the most unintuitive interface of the four. No Back button, no guidance on whether you’d saved the text or image or address, and no help text at all. It also withheld key information from me until the very last step in the process: how to pay. Trying to send a postcard brings up an error message, yet gives no clear instructions on how to solve the problem (i.e. how you buy the postcard and postage). This process is too convoluted. Once you stumble through that the card finally gets sent.

When it arrived the postcard looked the same as the preview but the card stock was not as high quality as i’d hoped. Plus it took longer than stated. Postcards cost $1.99 to send one, but if you buy in bulk you get a slight discount. It’s not worth it.

The Popcarte interface is slightly better than Postino, but not by much. As you move through each step of setting up a card there is no easy way to go back and change an element. You have to keep hitting the Back button until you’re where you need to be. This was very frustrating because the preview of the card did not match how I positioned my image. Thinking it might just be a bug, I sent the postcard, anyway.

It arrived looking like the preview image–i.e. kind of jacked up. Not worth $1.99.

Touchnote has an intuitive interface that is well-designed and easy to navigate. I like that I can choose a picture from my gallery and Share it to Touchnote instead of starting from inside this app. Also like that there’s a generous character allotment for the message on your postcard. The only thing I don’t like is that I can’t choose a font face or size.

The card I sent arrived in the stated time frame and looked as I expected.

MyPostcard stands above the rest for several reasons. The first is that you can put multiple images on one postcard. Choose either one photo to fill the frame, three photos, or a six photo grid. When you type out your message you have 450 characters to work with, but when you’re done with text the app will warn you if the current font size means the whole message won’t fit. The app is easy to navigate. Postcards cost €1.99 and you can pay via PayPal.

The card arrived looking better than I thought it would and within the stated timeframe.

So there you have it. If you’d like to send postcards from your phone using your own images, Touchnote and MyPostcard are your best bets. I hope you enjoy doing so!

12 responses to Best Postcard Apps For Smartphones

  1. I really like Postagram. Good quality stock, and I’ve been able to send them to foreign countries without issue. I’ve also been able to take advantage of a bunch of promos so I’ve accrued quite a few credits.

    On a related note, I really have had a lot of fun with Postcrossing, a project for randomized global postcard exchange.

  2. I like Postagram because the image pops out of the card to save in a wallet. I send them to my grandkids. I am pretty sure Postable now does postcards, too. And there is a new service called Inkly that allows for your own handwriting on the postcard (you photograph your message and upload it). I haven’t tried that one yet, but plan to do so.

    The big caveat to all these services is that they require YOU release the address of not just yourself, but the person you are writing to, and that release is forever. If the company sells to another, all that data goes with it. Make sure your recipient would not be upset by that kind of sharing of personal information.

  3. I have used Postcardly when traveling around the word and it’s great! You can purchase one, or a set, or by the month.

  4. Thank you for the research.
    I posted 35 letters & some postcards. & 10 post offices. Last Atco, NJ

  5. This feedback is terrific. Don’t know why it hadn’t occurred to me to search for a postcard app (dust in my little grey cells, perhaps), but I’m delighted to know my snaps can be converted while traveling.

  6. I like Touchnote a lot, it’s intuitive and easy and when there was a glitch their support team got back to me promptly and helpfully. My only minor gripe is that the font is quite large and I’d really like to have a choice of two sizes so that I can cram a bit more on if I want to. I’ve started to use it a lot for sending family cards – you can make greetings cards too – and it’s great to be able to send recent photos. You can buy packages of credits so it gets cheaper the more you buy.

    I was going to say, there is one caveat that I hadn’t thought about when I started using it – that some people are, quite reasonably, unhappy for their address to be given to a third party – but I’ve just realised that @PostMuse covered it already. I wouldn’t use it again for non-family without checking first, which rather detracts from its usefuleness.

  7. I like postcards webapp Postaget it’s better choice for me

  8. I love Touchnote! I started using it to send all of those little nagging thoughts and meet deadlines which used to make me anxious. I started with a postcard to my Dad beginning a letterwriting exchange that has proven eye-opening.
    I’m also glad that the app has expanded to include cards which I just used to send to my mom for Mother’s Day!
    Your article is very thorough and I encourage others to follow suit. If an app can be beautiful, personal, fun and helpful in getting some of these obligatory tasks completed in a timely way, I’m all for it!

  9. I use Postsnap, I think it’s the best photo card app by a long long way. You can have multiple photos, any font, any colour, size and put it anywhere on the card.

    I stopped using Touchnote because I saw the Postsnap reviews and thought I’d give it a go. I’m not disappointed, it’s SOO much better 🙂

    They’re much cheaper too! And they do birthday cards, what’s not to like!

  10. Marc said on May 25, 2016

    Recently moved away from Touchnote after discovering Postsnap (www.postsnap.com) – their postcard app is much better value for money and the amount of customisations I could do were unreal!

  11. Thank you
    Clear concise description of what’s available
    Postcards are my 90 year old mums delight didn’t know this was available until recently
    My postcard it is
    Cjeers
    Jeff

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