Would You Let A Robot Write Your Letters?

Here at Month of Letters we’re very pro analog methods of communication. But we don’t eschew all modern technology when it comes to sending things through the mail–not everyone is comfortable writing by hand, sending postcards right from your smartphone is awesome and fun, and keeping a record of correspondence without burying yourself in paper is just good sense.

However, there does come a point where technology takes all the fun out of things, and we may have reached that point with a service offered by a company called Bond. From a Fast Company profile done on them last year:

Bond wants to retain the delight of giving and receiving notes, without the hassle of heading to the stationery store, writing out a letter, finding stamps, and locating a mailbox. “Nobody has ever said, ‘You know what’s awesome? I had the best experience at American Greetings,'” said Caberwal. Bond wants to bring the romance back to letter writing with a more modern experience. “We have really set out to reimagine what that would look like—how we can create a truly personal experience that lets people deliver that personal touch that is truly theirs, but let them do it from anywhere,” he added.

Thanks to Bond’s robots, writing a note is indeed as easy as shooting off an email. That is, after the initial intake process, which involves completing and returning a handwriting sample designed to extract a person’s distinctive handwriting characteristics and style. The bot doesn’t just copy letters; it learns spacing patterns, angulation, how a person connects certain letters, and how far someone veers from the margins. Those details are what make your handwriting yours. For a computer to fully learn the nuances of a person’s penmanship would take pages and pages of samples. To avoid a too laborious a sign-up, the typeface specialists at Bond have whittled the process down to a couple of paragraphs, which allows for a pretty accurate representation of your handwriting, if not a 100% copy. For an added personal touch, there’s also a page where you can draw or select a doodle, like a smiley or peace sign, as your signature stamp.

The service is a little more expensive now than when this article went up as it seems most cards are $5 each. There is also apparently a smartphone app on the horizon that will allow you to send notes directly from there.

Given that I am a fan of sending postcards from my smartphone you’d think I’d be down with this, too. I’m actually on the fence about it. Handwritten notes should be written by hand, I feel. I don’t think sending a typed note is less personal. Thus, I feel like this is not the best combination of tech and note sending.

But I want to hear your thoughts, LetterMo community! Is Bond a service you would ever use? Why or why not? Have any of you used it before? tell us your experience!

One Reply to “Would You Let A Robot Write Your Letters?”

  1. What a wonderful option for folks who may not be able to handwrite but still want the personal feel of a handwritten card.

    I have repetitive stress injuries in both my elbows from my former life in publishing. Typing is much, much easier or me on my bad days. I would consider a service like this, but $5 is a bit steep for me.

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