Emily Post, 1922, Letter Etiquette

About the Challenge Forums Month of Letters 2017 Emily Post, 1922, Letter Etiquette

This topic contains 12 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Lyn Thorne-Alder Lyn Thorne-Alder 1 month ago.

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  • #46177
    Profile photo of Carrye
    Carrye
    Participant

    I haven’t read Emily Post in some time. Ran across her 1922 etiquette book while searching for stationery and thought others would enjoy. Page 448 begins her directives around stationery, letters, and notes.

    https://tinyurl.com/jcso9tu

    www.postable.com/mizlit / Postcardly referral: https://postcardly.com/ref/0polzmqh /Patreon Member/SendSomething.Net
    InCoWriMo 2017 Participant https://incowrimo-2017.org/ Letter Writers Alliance Member

  • #46214
    Profile photo of Lyn Thorne-Alder
    Lyn Thorne-Alder
    Participant

    “…use the lined guide that comes with all stationery…”

    Oh, it would be so nice if that were still the case!

    • #46364
      Profile photo of Carrye
      Carrye
      Participant

      Some certainly do, if you purchase pads of writing paper (especially those that are geared toward fountain pen use).
      Interesting question that I don’t know the answer to … at what point did paper — especially things like binder paper — become common use?

      www.postable.com/mizlit / Postcardly referral: https://postcardly.com/ref/0polzmqh /Patreon Member/SendSomething.Net
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  • #46519
    Profile photo of Vanessa Lacey
    Vanessa Lacey
    Participant

    I would love to do a letter based on the book and the \”old WAYS\” so awesome!!!!

  • #46523
    Profile photo of Brenda VR
    Brenda VR
    Participant

    Had to look the book up (google books was not letting me see much so went to gutenberg). What a wonderful read, heh!

    “Far better to use a guide than to send envelopes and pages of writing that slide up hill and down, in uncontrolled disorder.”

    I dug around a tiny bit and found : “According to Dard Hunter (Papermaking, The History and Technique of an Ancient Craft), an English patent for a ruling machine was granted in 1770 to John Tetlow. Before then, all paper was ruled by hand.” (according to Google), and on a Garden Path Language blog: “in the early 1800s, people started using the blue lined paper we see today”

  • #46626
    Profile photo of Carrye
    Carrye
    Participant

    @craftymommaonabudget What, specifically, of the “old ways” is lacking in modern correspondence? (I mean, of the postal kind … not the email kind 🙂 )

    @brendavr Thank you for looking that up! I continued to read on the Garden Path Language Blog that mass production of binder paper didn’t occur until 1914 — so not even 10 years before Post’s book. An certainly, I’d imagine she’d feel the way we do about using binder paper for stationery — especially something formal. She was pretty clear about the rules for household stationery.

    Now I’m wondering how the typewriter impacted correspondence? No need to worry about “uncontrolled disorder” if you could just type your letters! Post makes reference to typewriters, I think … I’ll have to go back and re-read. I was just reading the stationery sections. Makes me want to become a correspondence historian! This is why reference librarians are my superheroes.

    www.postable.com/mizlit / Postcardly referral: https://postcardly.com/ref/0polzmqh /Patreon Member/SendSomething.Net
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    • #46982
      Profile photo of Vanessa Lacey
      Vanessa Lacey
      Participant

      I am talking about the pens and stationary, they used, and the typewriters. The etiquette, the wording, I didn’t read the whole book, but I did save it.

  • #46640
    Profile photo of Brenda VR
    Brenda VR
    Participant

    Ya totally. There is so much interesting stuff in old reference books or such. Its a bit of a shame some of the niceties/formalities have been lost in modern times…in some ways (I totally love the freedom of this age). Although I don’t think I would be able to remember all the little rules….but I guess thats why these reference books were printed.

    Another nice tidbit : “No lady should ever sign a letter ‘respectfully,’ not even were she writing to a queen.”

    Heh.

  • #46651
    Profile photo of Carrye
    Carrye
    Participant

    Yes! I thought the “respectfully” bit was very interesting. Of course, now would be completely acceptable given women’s roles in business.

    I was amused about the variety of ways a man could sign a letter to his betrothed or wife, but it should not be printed in her, or any, book. 😀

    www.postable.com/mizlit / Postcardly referral: https://postcardly.com/ref/0polzmqh /Patreon Member/SendSomething.Net
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  • #46781
    Profile photo of Justine Coyne
    Justine Coyne
    Participant

    “Uncontrolled disorder” Lol! Because none of us can write in a straight line otherwise. Haha…really though, I love when paper is lined – but it’s hard to find eh? Remember Mead animal print pads anyone? I still find them sometimes at yard sales.

  • #47185
    Profile photo of Oriole Harris
    Oriole Harris
    Participant

    This was an interesting read. I am so glad that we don’t have to stick to boring rules about paper color now. I rather liked the envelopes that were no’s in her examples. The flourishes and designs on paper were also a no-no.

    One favorite book on this was by Louis Carol called Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter-Writing. It has some great tips. You can read it or download it herehttps://archive.org/details/eightorninewisew00carr

    Now to go write some letters

    Oriole Harris
    www.postable.com/orioleadamsharris

  • #49430
    Profile photo of Cooksterz
    Cooksterz
    Participant

    A neat read and share! I also have the physical copy of an older book Amy Vanderbilts Complete Book of Etiquette from 1952 – 1963.
    Check out the link to that one here: https://books.google.com/books?id=Wu_uw8aUE5wC&lpg=PR1&dq=amy%20vanderbilt's%20etiquette&pg=PA660#v=onepage&q&f=false
    Letters – Pg 664 I liked reading the Index listings for “Letters” page 773

    "Get your Hand OFF that mouse, and write a letter!" ? But then use it to click over to G+ and see Letter Month Mail Art pics here: https://goo.gl/photos/jQuzB2o3QvjFKm8A7

  • #49773
    Profile photo of Lyn Thorne-Alder
    Lyn Thorne-Alder
    Participant

    Remember Mead animal print pads anyone? I still find them sometimes at yard sales.

    Back in college, when I wrote all the time, I had a pad of paper – probably Mead – that was in 4 or 5 rainbow colors, lined, half-sheets, and envelopes to match. It was super useful for writing notes to my boyfriend & my parents. 😀

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