art cards

Send It, Frame It

Just after Christmas, my aunt was putting away all of our decorations and gathering up the many cards we’d had out on display. One card in particular she set aside and said she intended to frame since the art on it was so beautiful. I agreed, and it got me thinking about the cards and postcards I send.

art cards
These are going in the mail soon

I send a lot of postcards from my smartphone since it’s easy to use services like Touchnote to create one with one of my photos on the back. (Later this month I’ll put up a post comparing all my favorite apps.) They’re often pictures of me or some cool thing I think the recipient will appreciate. They’re meant to be saveable on the fridge or in a photo album, for people who have such things (and for people who wish to look at pictures of me now and then).

I really like the idea of sending art worthy of a frame or at least displaying beyond that courtesy period most cards get. Such postcards and cards may be found in the usual places if you search thoroughly or stumble on a great gallery or poster store. If you don’t have anything like that near where you live, or the selection isn’t all that interesting, here are some suggestions for places to look online.

Ink Dragon by freeminds

DeviantArt has more beautiful art than one person could ever comb through in a lifetime. Even better, DeviantArt has a Print Shop. Artists opt in to allow people to buy their art in multiple formats, including as postcards and greeting cards. You can browse by subject or start at an artist’s page–just click the Prints tab at the top to see if they’re offering any of their pieces.

Other art print shops that do postcards and/or greeting cards: Society6, Redbubble, and Pomegranate (check out their 100 mystery postcard box!)

Printsagram will create blank inside greeting cards from your Instagram photos (or any of your photos through Print Studio). The card stock they use is lovely and you can write a short or long note depending on which size you choose.

Zazzle also has a custom postcard and greeting card (both traditional and big sizes) creation tool. You can upload any image from your computer for these, and the image will fill the whole front instead of just a square, as with the Printstagram ones.

I know some of you must have received some beautiful cards, postcards, and letters over the years. Have you ever kept them out for display long after the holiday or special occasion? Framed them? Share pictures in the comments or using the hashtag #LetterMo on your social network of choice. I’d love to see!


P.S. In case you’re wondering, the cards from the top image are: Santoro Eclectic Selection (hummingbird and tortoise) found at B&N, a National Geographic photo card, A is for Alice promo card for the Wonderland Alphabet (art by Janet K Lee), a postcard from the Susan Seddon Boulet Bestiary, and Fairy Tale Woman by Alethea Kontis.

21 thoughts on “[Wayback Repost] Why do letters seem more daunting than email?”

  1. Having been a letter writer for several years now, I don’t particularly find this challenge all that difficult, other than remembering to do it every day instead of when the whim takes me to write. And since I may not have a penpal’s letter to answer, then I need to think outside my normal circle of penpals and write to others. I saw this as an opportunity to reconnect with a few old penpals that had lapsed, family members that live outside of the city, friends I haven’t seen in a while, and strangers or persons of stature. I think it’s a great challenge and maybe it will even boost the joy of those who process all this mail and deliver it to us. 🙂

      1. Yesterday the commenting seemed broken. I was commenting on the printable cards to slip into letters explaining LetterMo, but this WayBack showed up at the bottom of every post I opened. Sorry about that~

  2. I love your post. And I totally agree.

    Email, tweets n twitters, FB comments all have their place and moment in time where they are the appropriate way to respond.

    However, sending a letter, postcard, or notecard is the only way to connect with someone on a more personal, even intimate, level.

    The act of sending a missive does take time, but more importantly it takes thought. What paper will I use? What will I add (stickers, washi, etc.)? What will I say? Combined these choices will be a bright spot in someone’s day. Added bonus? It was created specifically for them.

  3. Great article on postcard apps but you should also take a look at Postsnap’s easy to use postcard app.
    http://www.postsnap.com
    https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/postsnap-best-postcard-sending/id650814139?mt=8
    The app offers a number of unique features compared to the other apps reviewed including:
    – Guest checkout with Apple Pay
    – Extensive personalization options including collage layouts, stylish borders which can be adjusted in size with a slider and the option to add editable text in a variety of font types and colors and position it anywhere on the cards
    – iPhone and iPad support
    – Apple Pencil support
    – Facebook and Instagram integration
    – US postal address verification and UK postcode lookup
    Cards are printed and posted in our facilities in the UK, USA and Australia on the same or next working day and so cards typically arrive quickly. Enjoy!
    Stephen Homer
    Founder
    Postsnap

  4. I love Tomoe River paper for letter writing. I buy 100 sheets at a time and print my own mermaid stationery. I found an envelope that I like and ordered a mermaid address stamp and finish it off with mermaid washi tape.

  5. I too love journals to pull apart for writing. For me the most important aspect of the paper is the pattern. I love to have some colour and some design on the paper. I’ve managed to find a number of nice colours and designs at one of my local “Home Sense” discount stores in the book section. Most of the small journals are a perfect size to fit in the envelopes I use. If not I just give one edge a bit of a trim (but sometimes I really like the ripped edge look too!) ;P

  6. Hi, Christmas cards & more recently a letter (a bill) from the UK to Australia have taken 3 weeks to arrive. The exterior of these envelopes were stamped with a mark such as this from the latest envelope:
    DLC 992-4
    14:55
    26/07/2017
    The example quoted arrived at the Australian address on 28/07/2017, unfortunately it contained a bill dated 06/07/2017 which had to be paid within 14 days, by 20/07/2017.
    Why is the post so slow? What does the DLC 992-4 stamp signify? Would appreciate your feedback.

  7. My letter that I wrote was in September. The person who it was for still hasn’t gotten it and it’s now November….
    I don’t understand why it’s taking this long. I live in AZ and he lives in NY. I want answers.

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